[:en]How parents, siblings can become teachers for special needs children[:]

[:en] Date: August 29, 2017 Source: Michigan State University Summary: Parents and siblings of children with limited speech who took an innovative training program significantly improved their ability to communicate with the special needs youth, outlines a new report.   Parents and siblings of children with limited speech who took an innovative training program created by a Michigan State University scholar significantly improved their ability to communicate with the special needs youth. Now, MSU research provides the first scientific evidence that the online training can improve communication in families with children with complex communication challenges. The findings are published in the journals Communication Disorders Quarterly and Infants & Young Children. Sarah Douglas, a… Read More

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[:en]Expectations for all-day schools are too high[:]

[:en]Date: August 28, 2017 Source: Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) Summary: Children in the German-speaking part of Switzerland who utilize extended education offerings in the first two years of primary school generally perform no better in school than other children, an project has found. Overall, the research shows that all-day schools do not fullfil all the expectations people place in them.   Children in the German-speaking part of Switzerland who utilise extended education offerings in the first two years of primary school generally perform no better in school than other children, an SNSF-funded project has found. Overall, the research shows that all-day schools do not fulfil all the expectations people… Read More

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[:en]Child’s home learning environment predicts 5th grade academic skills[:]

[:en]Date: August 15, 2017 Source: New York University Summary: Children whose parents provide them with learning materials like books and toys and engage them in learning activities and meaningful conversations in infancy and toddlerhood are likely to develop early cognitive skills that can cascade into later academic success.   Children whose parents provide them with learning materials like books and toys and engage them in learning activities and meaningful conversations in infancy and toddlerhood are likely to develop early cognitive skills that can cascade into later academic success, finds a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. The study, published online in the journal Applied Developmental… Read More

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[:en]Schools need to encourage broader participation in science learning[:]

[:en]Date: August 9, 2017 Source: Universitaet Tübingen Summary: Students from families with little interest in math benefit more from a school intervention program that aims at increasing math motivation than do students whose parents regard math as important. A study indicates the intervention program has a “Robin Hood effect” which reduces the “motivational gap” between students from different family backgrounds because new information about the importance of math is made accessible to underprivileged students.   Students from families with little interest in math benefit more from a school intervention program that aims at increasing math motivation than do students whose parents regard math as important. A study by researchers at… Read More

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[:en]Manipulating brain network to change cognitive functions[:]

[:en]Date: August 22, 2017 Source: Taylor & Francis Group Summary: Schools are failing to offer sufficient opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds to engage in science-based learning outside of the classroom, and should be doing more to open up participation, according to new research.   Schools are failing to offer sufficient opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds to engage in science-based learning outside of the classroom, and should be doing more to open up participation, according to new research published in the International Journal of Science Education. Analyzing survey data from almost 6,000 UK secondary schoolchildren (aged 11-16) from communities with traditionally low science engagement, the authors investigated who participates in… Read More

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[:en]Tiny molecule has big effect on brain’s ability to learn[:]

[:en]Date: August 7, 2017 Source: University of Queensland Summary: Prenatal brain development is a crucial period, and as new research has found, even small alterations to the way brain cells develop can have significant effects later in life. Scientists have shed light on the role that small molecules called microRNAs play in early brain development. The research found a close link between early brain developmental events and changes in cognitive function in adulthood.   Prenatal brain development is a crucial period, and as new research has found, even small alterations to the way brain cells develop can have significant effects later in life. In a study involving researchers from the… Read More

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